Picture of Dr. Beth Vonnahme Speaking in front of Fireplace in Scofield Hall

Programming

Upcoming programs can be found here.

Spring 2023

May 3, 2023: End-of-Year Showcase

The Center for Digital and Public Humanities hosted an end-of-year showcase on Wednesday, May 3, from 5:30-7:30 pm on the third floor of the Miller Nichols Library. Digital and Public Humanities Fellows and others working on DPH projects discussed their work in a lightning round.

April 2, 2023: Nelly Don: Labor, Unionization, and Community on the Factory Floor

On Sunday, April 2, from 2-3:30 pm at the Kansas City Public Library’s Helzberg Auditorium, Dr. Jane Greer discussed her new book, Unorganized Women: Repetitive Rhetorical Labor of Low-Wage Workers, 1837-1937. This work taps into a cache of 700 letters written by workers at the Donnelly Garment Company in the 1930s. The correspondence reveals how working women sought to build a collective identity as practical and comfortable as the Nelly Don garments they stitched and why they resisted the organizing overtures of the International Ladies Garment Workers’ Union. Greer is a Curators’ Distinguished Teaching Professor and AY22-23 Digital and Public Humanities Fellow. This public presentation was attended by over 100 community members and co-sponsored by the Kansas City Athenaeum and the Kansas City Public Library.

March 23, 2023: A Murder in No Man’s Land

On Thursday, March 23, from 4-5 pm in Miller Nichols Library Room 325, Professor and AY22-23 DPH Fellow Mitch Brian gave a talk entitled “A Murder in No Man’s Land: Exploring Family Trauma, Mythology, and the Documentary Process.” While investigating his great-grandfather’s murder in the Oklahoma Territory of 1902, Professor Brian discovered conflicting family histories of the victim and killer. Recent contacts with descendants have turned up unexpected revelations and created new mysteries, making the process of reconciling these accounts with a fragmented historical record even more challenging. Attendees were invited to help put the pieces together and discuss the narrative strategies that could be deployed in a documentary film account of the investigation.

March 16, 2023: Text as Data Workshop, Part 2

On Thursday, March 16, from 3-4 pm, Dr. Ye Wang and her collaborators shared their work on an automated data warehouse design that is supporting collective impact across 31 colleges and universities. Dr. Alexis Petri, Dr. Yugyung Lee, Dr. Wang, and an NSF-via-Auburn-University team are working with colleges from the Northern Marianas to Maine and rely on the data system to automate all the information requests and reporting and to permit each college to tailor parts of the instruments to fit their culture and needs. Participants used WeListen, another text-as-data tool, to provide feedback on the automated data warehouse design. The in-workshop experience enabled participants to see how WeListen immediately prepares and presents data. Finally, Dr. Wang and Dr. Virginia Blanton led a discussion of the implications of Text as Data for Digital Humanities. This “Text as Data” workshop was co-sponsored by the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence, the Office of Research Development, and the Center for Digital and Public Humanities and was the second in a two-part series.

February 13, 2023: Digital Dirty Books: A Public Bernardin Lecture by Dr. Kathryn Rudy

On February 13, 2023 from 3:30-4:30 pm in the Miller Nichols Library, manuscript scholar Dr. Kathryn Rudy gave a presentation on new research related to her project “Dirty Books,” which uses digital tools to investigate how books of hours were read and handled in the late Middle Ages. An internationally-recognized scholar of the reception and function of medieval manuscripts, Kathryn Rudy is Bishop Wardlaw Professor of Art History at the University of St. Andrews, a member of the St. Andrews Institute of Medieval Studies, and the Director of the Centre for the Study of Medieval Manuscripts and Technology. This lecture was presented by the Department of English and the Department of Media, Art and Design with support from the UMKC School of Humanities and Social Sciences, The Center for Digital and Public Humanities, and the Bernardin Lecture Fund.

Fall 2022

November 16, 2022: Text as Data Workshop, Part 1

On Wednesday, November 16, from 3-4:30 pm in the Digital Collaboration Studio in the Miller Nichols Library and on Zoom, AY22-23 DPH Faculty Fellows Ye Wang and Virginia Blanton offered an introduction to “data” and how it is integral to the study of the arts and humanities. Through the presentation of a case study, they invited other researchers to think about how their quantitative projects are also qualitative. This workshop was co-sponsored by the Center for Advancing Faculty Excellence, the Office of Research Development, and the Center for Digital and Public Humanities and was the first in a two-part series.

November 7, 2022: Getting Started with Clio Workshop

On Monday, November 7, from 5:30-6:30 pm, Dr. David Trowbridge, an AY22-23 DPH Faculty Fellow and the William T. Kemper Associate Research Professor in Digital and Public Humanities, hosted a workshop for the Kansas City community on how to use and become a contributor to Clio. Clio is a free website and mobile app created by Dr. Trowbridge to connect people to the history and culture all around them.

2008-2021

Summer 2021: Wide-Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression NEH Workshop 

Dr. Diane Mutti Burke received a Landmarks of American History and Culture grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop and deliver a summer workshop for K-12 educators from across the United States. The Wide-Open Town workshop explored historical landmarks and cultural resources in Kansas City in order to better understand the pivotal decades of the 1920s and 1930s in United States history. The Department of History and the Center for Midwestern Studies hosted this workshop virtually in Summer 2021.

2016-2018: Wide Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression Project

The Wide Open Town: Kansas City in the Jazz Age and Great Depression Project, led by Drs. Diane Mutti Burke and John Herron, included a well-attended public conference at the Kansas City Public Library (2016), an edited volume of new scholarship published by the University Press of Kansas (2018), and contributed to The Pendergast Years website created by the Kansas City Public Library.

April 19-21, 2018: “Strength through Numbers” Symposium on Quindaro, KS

This project, led by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke, was a collaboration between the UMKC Center for Midwestern StudiesFreedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area, the Kansas City Public Library, and the Kansas City, Kansas Public Library. The project partners organized a well-attended public conference that focused on the important history of Quindaro, Kansas.

2008-2017: Crossroads of Conflict: Contested Visions of Freedom during the Kansas and Missouri Border Wars NEH Workshop

Dr. Diane Mutti Burke has received multiple National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks of American History and Culture grants to develop and deliver educational summer workshops for K-12 educators from across the United States. The Crossroads of Conflict: Contested Visions of Freedom during the Kansas and Missouri Border Wars workshop explored historic homes and public buildings, landscapes, and archival collections in light of recent scholarship in order to better understand the clash of cultures and differing definitions of “freedom” that played out on the Missouri-Kansas border. The Department of History and the Center for Midwestern Studies hosted this workshop in 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 and 2017.

Spring 2015: Interpreting Slavery at Historic Sites Workshop

This spring 2015 workshop was led by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke and jointly organized by the UMKC Center for Midwestern Studies and Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area. The one-day workshop provided education to local museum and historic site professionals about best practices for interpreting slavery at their sites.

2011-2013: Border Wars Project

This project, led by Dr. Diane Mutti Burke, included a well-attended public conference at the Kansas City Public Library (2011), an edited volume of new scholarship published by the University Press of Kansas (2013), and contributed to The Civil War on the Western Border website created by the Kansas City Public Library.

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